Putting Lemurian Virtues to the Test

I manage properties for absentee owners in an upscale community. One client asked me to supervise a landscaping project and guesthouse remodel with a time goal. But he added, “As much as I like you, you don’t have a mean bone in your body, and frankly I don’t think you have what it takes to push these guys to make their deadlines.”

“I’m a Lemurian,” I said; “we’re taught to lead by example. Who will do his best work, one who fears reprisal, or one who respects you?” “You have a point,” he said, “but they may eat you alive!” I talked if over with my wife, knowing it would make many demands and I would need all the Lemurian virtues to pull it off. Then I accepted.

I hadn’t worked in home construction recently, and codes had changed. So when the cement contractors arrived, I asked a lot of questions and expressed interest in their work. They spoke politely in English, but Spanish comments in the background were somewhat less polite. Having lived in Mexico, I understood but ignored these, bringing out a table for their plans, and as it got hotter, a shade umbrella. The background comments slowed, and when I began handing out Gatorade, they changed to good-natured ones like, “Where’s the super? I’m thirsty!”

As new workers arrived, I told them, “We have a deadline no one thinks we can meet, so let’s make it easy on each other. I’ll do anything I can to make your job easier, so just work with me.” They did. I provided work areas, power, water, garbage cans, shade, fans and drinks. I jockeyed vehicles around so they could load and unload tools and material, ran to get parts and materials, helped carry things, learned their names, asked about their methods and thanked them for their good work. Soon, if I got back late from an errand, I’d find the fences had been put up and locked, the road washed and the site cleaned. They would tell new people not to park on the north side of the street and did many other things to help me out.

When the owner came to check on us, he saw over 60 people setting tile, hanging doors, welding, landscaping, painting, plumbing. He agreed my method worked after all.

I asked if I could use his refrigerator to keep cold drinks for the workers. He thought it was a great idea and reimbursed me for the drinks. That bill was over $1000, but it was worth it. It was fascinating to see all those people from different trades stopping together to enjoy a cool drink; like sharing a meal, it creates a level of camaraderie that is sometimes rare on construction sites.

Trying to juggle my regular responsibilities with this new one seemed impossible at times, but except for a temporary rise in blood pressure, it was a great experience, stretching my capabilities. I tried to stay calm, cheerful, and approachable, and never yelled at anyone. The job was completed on time to everyone’s satisfaction, a memorable demonstration of Lemurian principles in action.

Spiritual Help in a Firestorm

Gateway East End Showing Untouched Buildings Surrounded by Scorched Land
Gateway East End Showing Untouched Buildings Surrounded by Scorched Land

One of the most difficult experiences of my life was being caught in a fierce wildfire. When my husband and I saw smoke in the distance with strong dry desert winds behind it, we knew a fire was headed our way. But no fire planes were taking off from the nearby airport, due to the strong winds.

Sometimes Lemurian students expect that we will get spiritual help to spare us from such disasters because we are trying to live by the Lemurian Teachings and we believe in God and the Masters. Some are disappointed to find that disasters touch many of our lives. But we were  helped in a most ingenious way.

That night we got a reverse 911 call telling us to evacuate, but before we knew it the fire was upon us. We raced to a large shop on open, well-cleared land with fire hoses previously set up at the ready. As the dry hot winds fed the flames surrounding our property, the noise was unnerving. And it was hard to know which way the fire would go with the winds so erratic.

Yet, each time I prayed, “please may the winds die down so our town will be spared and all who live in it,” the winds seemed to kick up. It was almost like being mocked.

I felt like a spiritual failure, I was so inept at prayers God hears.

As we stood there helplessly watching the flames burning around us on all sides, the scorching wind and fire roared like a wild animal. But inside that seeming chaos was also a quietness – a sense of something so much bigger than we are. I felt the only thing solid is God. And the only thing strong enough to save us was God. Would I deny God by not believing all would be as it should be?

Gradually, with amazement and relief, I realized that because the winds were blowing so fiercely, the fire raced through our property so fast it barely touched most of our buildings long enough to set them alight. It burned right up to the buildings but left most of them intact!

Only because the winds stayed so strong were we spared from destruction! Had God and the Masters granted my prayer and slowed the winds, we might have lost everything. I’d wanted God to do what I felt was best, not what He knew was best! I guess it’s natural to think this way in a life-threatening situation. But it’s funny to look back on this puzzled human being standing there with her hands on her hips wondering why, when she prays, the winds don’t instantly die down – and deciding she must be spiritually inadequate!

We came through it so well that while hundreds of acres around us were nothing but charred earth and rocks, our several buildings remained mostly intact, a small oasis of green. Viewing this from the top of one of our hills, it was proof that in times of greatest danger, God always extends the assistance we need. God hears my prayers. It was almost like hearing God say, “See, I was here. Thanks for offering to direct things, but I had it in hand.”

“What is a Lemurian?” Find Out Here and Now!

Eye hath not seen, nor ear heard, neither have entered into the heart of man, the things which God hath prepared for them that love him.  ICorinthians 2-9

We used to get this question a lot, but not as much now that more people are familiar with the term and have some definite ideas about it. Still, “Lemurian” means different things to different folks. We talk with people who have an innate feeling they once lived on the massive continent that long ago graced the area of the earth now taken up by the Pacific Ocean. Others express a mystical belief that somehow, they are Lemurian. And many of these people may be right.

To us, “Lemurian” refers to the inhabitants of Lemuria, or Mu, an ancient civilization of such antiquity that it’s more a myth than a memory today. Its origin is thousands of years before commonly accepted history and predates even Plato’s Atlantis. Its people are of great interest to us because they accomplished something no one else has come close to doing since — creating an organized and harmonious society that endured for 50,000 years. We learn of the beginnings of the Lemurian civilization and of the wise and highly advanced beings who guided it in Dr. Robert D. Stelle’s book, The Sun Rises, revealed to him clairvoyantly from Nature’s infallible Akashic Record.

Those of the Lemurian Fellowship, the Lemurian Order, and Fellowship students today are Lemurians because we study and try to live by the Lemurian Philosophy, the most ancient of all religious teachings.

We understand if you feel that a philosophy claiming to be based on such unconventional and seemingly mythical elements would be sketchy at best and delusional at worst. But you’d be mistaken.

Far from a figment of someone’s imagination, fantasy, or science fiction, the Lemurian Philosophy is true, authentic, and thoroughly practical. Since the Masters of the Lemurian Brotherhood first began releasing these teachings to the public through the Lemurian Fellowship in 1936, thousands of students have studied and used its timeless principles to improve their lives, discover and fulfill their purpose in being on this earth, and make real progress in the pursuit of happiness, affirmed as a human right in the Declaration of Independence of the United States of America.

Through the Lemurian Fellowship’s blog, we hope to answer some questions and convey the essence of what it’s like to use the Lemurian Philosophy in your life, in marriage, at work, or as one of many dedicated to improving themselves and creating a society based on natural law, positive thinking and mutual respect.

Our points of view are shared in the Lemurian Take articles, and personal stories will be found in the Lemurian Growth Point stories. We hope you find something of interest and inspiration here. We look forward to sharing our ideas and experiences with you, and to hearing from you, too.